A Third Party Review Of Stampin’ Up From Someone Who Didn’t Join

By:Jaime Soriano October 8, 2010

MLM Reviews

If you’re reading this article, chances are you’re probably searching for information on Stampin’ Up and you’re thinking about becoming a distributor. Before you join, I want to encourage you to read this simple, unbiased, third party review. In it, I’ll cover some details about the company, their products, their compensation plan and, most of all, what you can do to increase your chances of success, should you decide to join.

First, let’s cover some basic information on the company itself. Stampin’ Up is a privately-held, multi-million dollar company that sells an exclusive line of rubber stamp sets and accessories through a direct sales business model. The company was started 20 years ago by Shelli Gardner and her sister. Currently, Gardner is the company’s CEO and over the past few years has been awarded the prestigious Ernst & Young “Entrepreneur Of The Year” award twice. While the company is based in Utah, Stampin’ Up has more than 45,000 distributors and is operating in the US, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, France, Germany and the UK. In addition, from a business perspective, it’s important to note that the company has been named one of Utah’s fastest growing companies for several years.

As far as the products go, Stampin’ Up markets several different product lines. Their flagship product line is made up of their award winning rubber stamps. They also market a line of designer paper, a line of embellishments and accessories, a line of scrapbook products, a line of home decorations and a complete line of scrap-booking tools. From a marketing perspective, it’s good to know that none of the company’s products can be found in retail stores and can only be purchased exclusively through distributors.

Now, let’s cover the compensation plan. There are a couple of ways you can earn upfront income by personally selling products including personal commissions and personal rebates. In addition to that, you can recruit other people and get paid overrides on sales they make. There are also additional incentives like trips, cash bonuses and different awards. For the most part, the compensation looks quite fair. However, if you’re serious about joining, it would make sense to review the compensation plan in detail so you can identify all the little details and how you can advance through the system.

In closing, Stampin’ Up is a well established company that sells good products. With that said, that has little to do with whether or not you will experience the success you want. While it’s obviously beneficial to you to have a solid company backing your business, what really determines whether you will succeed or not, is your ability to recruit other distributors, your ability to sell products on a consistent basis and your ability to build a solid organization of distributors. And, one of the biggest factors to accomplishing those three things is your ability to market. If you don’t have a clue about marketing, you’ll have a tough time building your business. It’s important to your success that you get the right marketing training so you can brand yourself as a leader and generate an endless flow of quality, pre-interested leads. Of course, you can build your business strictly using old-school, traditional, offline techniques but, for most people, calling on your existing warm market will only take you so far. If you can combine effective offline strategies with the ability to generate 10-30+ leads a day online, there’s no telling how successful you can be with your Stampin’ Up business.

Jaime Soriano wrote this Stampin Up Review for people looking into the company. Sadly, most distributors will never see the success they desire because they lack the marketing skills to generate sufficient leads for their business. To learn how you can generate more leads than you can get to, visit Jaime’s MLM Training

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter
, , , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.